Middle Term

  

Middle term in British English. The term that appears in both the major and minor premises of a syllogism, but not in the conclusion. Also called: mean, middle. Collins English Dictionary. Since the middle term is undistributed in both premises, the argument commits the undistributed middle fallacy. The Fallacy of the Undistributed Middle Term occurs when the middle term is undistributed in both premises. Corresponding Rule: In a valid standard form categorical syllogism, the middle term must be distributed in at least one premise. Therefore, when the last term is negative, as in this case, the middle term is the difference of the. So, the middle term = T(n/2) + 1. = T (4 + 1) T 5. General term: T(r+1) = ncr x(n-r) ar. X = 3x, a = 2x2/3, r = 4 and n = 8. T (4 + 1) = 8c4 (3x)(8-4) (2x2/3)4. = (8 ⋅ 7 ⋅ 6 ⋅ 5)/ (4 ⋅ 3 ⋅ 2 ⋅ 1) (3x)4 (2x2/3)4. = (8 ⋅ 7 ⋅ 6 ⋅ 5)/ (4 ⋅ 3 ⋅ 2 ⋅ 1) (3x)4 (2x2/3)4.

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middle term

n. Abbr. MTermLogic
The term in a syllogism presented in both premises but not appearing in the conclusion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

middle term

n
(Logic) logic the term that appears in both the major and minor premises of a syllogism, but not in the conclusion. Also called: meanormiddle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mid′dle term′


Termn.
the term of a syllogism that appears in both premises but not in the conclusion.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Noun1.middle term - the term in a syllogism that is common to both premises and excluded from the conclusion
term - one of the substantive phrases in a logical proposition; 'the major term of a syllogism must occur twice'
major premise, major premiss - the premise of a syllogism that contains the major term (which is the predicate of the conclusion)
minor premise, minor premiss, subsumption - the premise of a syllogism that contains the minor term (which is the subject of the conclusion)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

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Middle Term Exam

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In logic, a middle term is a term that appears (as a subject or predicate of a categorical proposition) in both premises but not in the conclusion of a categorical syllogism.[1] Example:

Major premise: All men are mortal.
Minor premise: Socrates is a man.
Conclusion: Socrates is mortal.

Middle Term Goals

The middle term is bolded above.

References[edit]

This article is based on material taken from the Free On-line Dictionary of Computing prior to 1 November 2008 and incorporated under the 'relicensing' terms of the GFDL, version 1.3 or later.

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